1. Call for Papers

  2. Welcome message

  3. Invited speakers/Plenary sessions

  4. Technical program

  5. Committees

http://www.eutecus.com

ABOUT CNNA 2010

OTHER

February 3-5

Berkeley, California

    Cellular architecture is a key component in billion-transistor chips hosting megaprocessor computing systems.  Kiloprocessor devices – such as GPUs, FPGAs, and visual microprocessors – are already in the market. Cellular architectures, i.e. locality-driven architectures, are important in processor arrays because at the nanoscale, physics is forcing designers towards locality driven cellular architectures, whether in CMOS or non-CMOS technology. Parallelism by itself is not enough: locality and communication distance, as well as the local interaction between the processors, are important issues too. Hence, this necessitates spatial-temporal elementary instructions in a new form of algorithmic thinking; a new kind of computer science and engineering is emerging.


    After 20 years of active research and recently the birth of an active startup industry, CNN technology – based on the locally connected dynamic array computing and now distilled into the Cellular Wave Computing framework – is expanding to meet the challenges highlighted above. A bulk of knowledge and a technical culture with outstanding scientists has been developed, ready to be exploited in this new era of megaprocessor computing


    The series of IEEE CNNA biannual international workshops, started in Budapest in 1990, is now converging to a new direction: megaprocessor computing. The venue is symbolic: Berkeley, the birthplace of CNN technology. The timing is meritorious and not accidental: just before the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) held in San Francisco.

The strong industry involvement is highlighted by plenary speakers from both leading corporations – HP, IBM, INTEL, and XILINX – and startup companies – AnaFocus Ltd. and Eutecus Inc. – representing not only the CMOS, but also the technology beyond CMOS.


    A new era in nanoscale computing is emerging: Join us at CNNA 2010 in Berkeley!